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Full text of "Tools"

Protect Header Pins During Transport 



Make] Projects 

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build, hack, tweak, share, discover,- 



Protect Header Pins During 

Transport 

Written By: David Scheltema 



TOOLS: 



Binder's board (1) 
Foam board (1) 
Hot Glue gun & hot glued) 
Leather Paring Knife (1) 



SUMMARY 

If you are like me then you have to travel to your maker space, but how do you pack up all 
those Arduino shields and other PCBs with header pins? 

The solution is simple: take a rigid lightweight board and give it a plastic foam top. 

Your shields can ride in the secure comfort of foam rigidly backed with Davey binder's 
board. 

No more poking bags or fingers in transit with this simple solution, and it is a project ready 
for further customization: why not make its dimensions fit inside a toolbox or a plastic 
container? There are many ways you can expand this simple and effective portability 
solution. 

© Make Projects www.makeprojects.com Page 1 of 5 



Protect Header Pins During Transport 



Step 1 — Protect Header Pins During Transport 




• Take your Davey board (or rigid stock) and cut to your desired size. 

• I determined my board dimensions based only on the size of plastic foam I had. I wanted a 
contiguous piece of foam and so I cut the board to match that size. 

Step 2 






• Roughly trace out the distance between your shield's rows of header pins and draw a guide 
on the Davey board. 

• My oscillating lines denote the general vicinity in which a pin placement might occur. 

• This step is important because we want the depth of the plastic foam to remain consistent 
and adding hot glue could potentially create obstructions for the pins. 



© Make Projects 



www.makeprojects.com 



Page 2 of 5 



Protect Header Pins During Transport 



Step 3 




• Apply the hot glue to the areas you 
determine will not have pins hitting 
them. 

• I found it essential to draw out the 
prospective pin placement, though 
this is obviously not exacting. 



© Make Projects 



www.makeprojects.com 



Page 3 of 5 



Protect Header Pins During Transport 



Step 4 




Q 



• Align a corner of the plastic foam 
piece at one of the two corners of 
your Davey board farthest from 
your body — I chose the left but 
suspect that you will have your 
own starting-corner preference. 

• While holding down the corner of 
plastic foam and Davey board you 
have mated, take the other corner 
farthest away from your body and 
align foam and board. Glue these 
two corners down. 

• By securing the two corners 
you can then take a bone 
folder or a large board and press 
firmly down on the entire foam and 
Davey board pairing while your 
glue sets. 

• Apply glue at the places you have 
marked for it. Lay the foam down 
on the glue, place the second rigid 
board on top of the assembly and 
place a suitable weight on top of 
that. 

• Note: the board you use to press 
down with needs to be larger than 
your foam and Davey board 
combination to ensure even 
pressure. Notice how I put the 
stoneware atop the large Davey 
board. 



© Make Projects 



www.makeprojects.com 



Page 4 of 5 



Protect Header Pins During Transport 



Step 5 








• Once you let the glue dry for a bit with the weight supplying even pressure you will have a 
nice layer of Davey board, glue, and plastic foam. 

• Tip: Tug a bit on the plastic foam to test whether you used enough glue or if there 
are any voids. Hopefully the amount of glue and the relatively consistent weight 
spread the glue; however, double check just in case as the last thing you want is an 
incomplete gluing. 

• Expand the Idea: This is just how to make the rigid sandwich, but a more elegant design 
could be made to fit perfectly inside a toolbox or a traveling case. I would love to hear 
about how you take this simple project and use it to create more nuanced adaptations. 



The parts need not all be sourced specifically. This guide is a simple idea and a simple 
execution. I documented what I used and where I at one time obtained the tools or materials. 
You can do well to ignore the specifics and explicate the concept yourself. 



This document was last generated on 201 3-02-1 8 01 :04:1 3 PM. 



© Make Projects 



www.makeprojects.com 



Page 5 of 5